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    Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.) is rich in bioactive molecules as phenolics, which can act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, among others; however, due to its high perishability, most of this fruit is wasted. Freezing and sun drying have been the most adopted techniques to avoid its postharvest deterioration. Nevertheless, both processes have presented some drawbacks as high storage costs and losses of bioactive molecules. Therefore, to preserve these molecules, this study compared the impact of convective airflow drying (CAD), freezing (FR), freeze drying (FD), and swell drying (SD). Total phenolics content (TPC), total flavonoids content (TFC), kuromanin concentration (KC), and antioxidant activity (antiradical activity (ARA) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay (TEAC)) of chokecherries were measured. "Swell drying" is a drying process coupling convective airflow drying to the Instant Controlled Pressure Drop (DIC) expansion. A central composite rotatable design was applied to optimize the DIC variables and responses. Results showed that both freezing and swell drying effectively preserve the TPC, TFC, KC, and ARA. Moreover, SD samples also presented the highest TEAC. Contrary, in the case of CAD, it caused the highest losses of both antioxidant content and activity. Swell drying remedies the shrinkage and collapsing of dried food structure, which results in a better antioxidants extraction.

    Citation

    Carmen Téllez-Pérez, Anaberta Cardador-Martínez, Viridiana Tejada-Ortigoza, Marla C Soria-Mejía, Iván Balderas-León, Maritza Alonzo-Macías. Antioxidant Content of Frozen, Convective Air-Dried, Freeze-Dried, and Swell-Dried Chokecherries (Prunus virginiana L.). Molecules (Basel, Switzerland). 2020 Mar 06;25(5)

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    PMID: 32155801

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