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    Investigate sexual identity and racial/ethnic differences in awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms. Cross-sectional. 2014 and 2017 National Health Interview Survey. 54 326 participants. Exposure measures were sexual identity (heterosexual, gay/lesbian, bisexual, "something else") and race/ethnicity. Awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms was assessed. Sex-stratified logistic regression analyses to examine sexual identity and racial/ethnic differences in awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms. Gay men were more likely than heterosexual men to identify calling 911 as the correct action if someone is having a heart attack (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.18-3.96). The majority of racial/ethnic minority heterosexuals reported lower rates of awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms than White heterosexuals. Hispanic sexual minority women had lower awareness of heart attack symptoms than White heterosexual women (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.25-0.74), whereas Asian sexual minority women reported lower awareness of stroke symptoms (AOR = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.80). Hispanic (AOR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.33-0.84) and Asian (AOR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.14-0.84) sexual minority men reported lower awareness of stroke symptoms than White heterosexual men. Hispanic and Asian sexual minorities had lower rates of awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms. Health information technology may be a platform for delivering health education and targeted health promotion for sexual minorities of color.

    Citation

    Billy A Caceres, Meghan Reading Turchioe, Anthony Pho, Theresa A Koleck, Ruth Masterson Creber, Suzanne B Bakken. Sexual Identity and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Awareness of Heart Attack and Stroke Symptoms: Findings From the National Health Interview Survey. American journal of health promotion : AJHP. 2021 Jan;35(1):57-67


    PMID: 32551829

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