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Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a cellular process that forms two different cell types through a cell division and is thus critical for the development of all multicellular organisms. Not all but many of the ACD processes are mediated by proper orientation of the mitotic spindle, which segregates the fate determinants asymmetrically into daughter cells. In many cell types, the evolutionarily conserved protein complex of Gαi/AGS-family protein/NuMA-like protein appears to play critical roles in orienting the spindle and/or generating the polarized cortical forces to regulate ACD. Studies in various organisms reveal that this conserved protein complex is slightly modified in each phylum or even within species. In particular, AGS-family proteins appear to be modified with a variable number of motifs in their functional domains across taxa. This apparently creates different molecular interactions and mechanisms of ACD in each developmental program, ultimately contributing to developmental diversity across species. In this review, we discuss how a conserved ACD machinery has been modified in each phylum over the course of evolution with a major focus on the molecular evolution of AGS-family proteins and its impact on ACD regulation. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Citation

Florence D M Wavreil, Mamiko Yajima. Diversity of activator of G-protein signaling (AGS)-family proteins and their impact on asymmetric cell division across taxa. Developmental biology. 2020 Sep 15;465(2):89-99

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PMID: 32687894

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