Correlation Engine 2.0
Clear Search sequence regions


  • acid (1)
  • adenovirus (135)
  • AdVs (2)
  • agar (2)
  • amino acid (6)
  • and virus (2)
  • anti- igg (1)
  • b virus (1)
  • bacteria (3)
  • base (29)
  • capsid (25)
  • capsid proteins (4)
  • case (1)
  • cell membrane (1)
  • cells plates (1)
  • cellular (2)
  • chimeras (54)
  • crystal (1)
  • cscl (1)
  • culture media (1)
  • d cells (1)
  • dapi (5)
  • data file (3)
  • dbp (1)
  • defensins (45)
  • defensins (1)
  • digest (1)
  • direct (2)
  • dna library (1)
  • echovirus (2)
  • eGFP (5)
  • elements (1)
  • endocytosis (1)
  • ester (1)
  • exon (2)
  • factors ix (1)
  • factors x (1)
  • fiber (28)
  • fiber c (1)
  • genbank (1)
  • gene (1)
  • genotypes (5)
  • glycans (1)
  • glycerol (2)
  • glycol (2)
  • gold (1)
  • HD5 (190)
  • hepes (1)
  • hiv 1 (2)
  • humans (149)
  • ice (9)
  • immunoblot (1)
  • lactoferrin (2)
  • LAMP1 (3)
  • light green (1)
  • lipids (1)
  • mgcl2 (2)
  • mice (1)
  • mutagenesis (1)
  • neutrophils (1)
  • nitrogen (2)
  • nucleus cell (2)
  • number cell (1)
  • orf (3)
  • pac i (1)
  • paneth cells (1)
  • parent (2)
  • penicillin (1)
  • peptides (4)
  • phase (2)
  • phenol red (1)
  • phenotypes (6)
  • polyomaviruses (1)
  • ppat (9)
  • proteoglycans (1)
  • protocol (32)
  • reagent (1)
  • receptor (7)
  • receptor virus (1)
  • salmon (2)
  • sapphire (2)
  • sds page (2)
  • serum (2)
  • serum albumin (1)
  • serum free media (14)
  • shigella (2)
  • sialic acid (1)
  • signal (3)
  • small intestine (2)
  • sodium (1)
  • stain (1)
  • streptomycin (1)
  • thus acid (1)
  • too (1)
  • TP 1 (1)
  • tris (5)
  • triton x 100 (1)
  • tween 80 (1)
  • typhoon (1)
  • viral capsid (3)
  • viral genomes (1)
  • viral proteins (2)
  • virion (12)
  • virus binds (1)
  • β defensins (2)
  • β5 integrin (14)
  • θ defensin (1)
  • θ defensin (1)
  • Sizes of these terms reflect their relevance to your search.

    Enteric alpha-defensins are potent effectors of innate immunity that are abundantly expressed in the small intestine. Certain enteric bacteria and viruses are resistant to defensins and even appropriate them to enhance infection despite neutralization of closely related microbes. We therefore hypothesized that defensins impose selective pressure during fecal-oral transmission. Upon passaging a defensin-sensitive serotype of adenovirus in the presence of a human defensin, mutations in the major capsid protein hexon accumulated. In contrast, prior studies identified the vertex proteins as important determinants of defensin antiviral activity. Infection and biochemical assays suggest that a balance between increased cell binding and a downstream block in intracellular trafficking mediated by defensin interactions with all of the major capsid proteins dictates the outcome of infection. These results extensively revise our understanding of the interplay between defensins and non-enveloped viruses. Furthermore, they provide a feasible rationale for defensins shaping viral evolution, resulting in differences in infection phenotypes of closely related viruses.

    Citation

    Karina Diaz, Ciara T Hu, Youngmee Sul, Beth A Bromme, Nicolle D Myers, Ksenia V Skorohodova, Anshu P Gounder, Jason G Smith. Defensin-driven viral evolution. PLoS pathogens. 2020 Nov 24;16(11):e1009018

    Expand section icon Mesh Tags

    Expand section icon Substances


    PMID: 33232373

    View Full Text