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    A common concern surrounding increasingly permissive marijuana policies in the US is that they will lead to more dangerous behavior, including driving after marijuana use. Although there is considerable research on the effects of marijuana policies on behaviours, few studies have examined self-reported driving after marijuana use. In this study, we use data from the Traffic Safety Culture Index (TSCI) to model self-reported past-year driving after marijuana use in association with medical and recreational marijuana policies. We analysed individual responses to annual administrations of TSCI from years 2013-2017 using a multiple logistic regression model. Our outcome variable was self-reported past-year driving after marijuana use (at least once vs. never), and our primary explanatory variable was the respondents' state medical marijuana (MM) and recreational marijuana (RM) policy. Additional explanatory variables include policies that specify thresholds for marijuana-intoxicated driving, year, and demographic factors. Drivers in states that legalized MM but not RM had marginally higher odds of self-reporting driving after marijuana use compared to drivers in states where both RM and MM were illegal (adjusted OR 1.29; 95% CI 0.98, 1.70; p = 0.075). However, we found little evidence that drivers in states that legalized both RM and MM had higher odds of driving after marijuana use compared to drivers in states where both RM and MM were illegal (adjusted OR 1.06; 95% CI 0.71, 1.56; p = 0.784). Per-se or THC threshold laws were associated with lower self-reported driving after marijuana use (adjusted OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.57, 0.95; p = 0.018). Although we found some evidence of an association between MM legalization and self-reported driving after marijuana use, our results provide only mixed support for the hypothesis that permissive marijuana policies are associated with higher odds of self-reported driving after marijuana use. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

    Citation

    Marco H Benedetti, Li Li, Lucas M Neuroth, Kayleigh D Humphries, Ashley Brooks-Russell, Motao Zhu. Self-reported driving after marijuana use in association with medical and recreational marijuana policies. The International journal on drug policy. 2020 Oct 22:102944


    PMID: 33268196

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