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    Reactions of cyclometalated compounds are numerous. This account is focused on one of such reactions, the exchange of cyclometalated ligands, a reaction between a cyclometalated compound and an incoming ligand that replaces a previously cyclometalated ligand to form a new metalacycle: + H-C*~Z ⇄ + H-C~Y. Originally discovered for PdII complexes with Y/Z = N, P, S, the exchange appeared to be a mechanistically challenging, simple, and convenient routine for the synthesis of cyclopalladated complexes. Over four decades it was expanded to cyclometalated derivatives of platinum, ruthenium, manganese, rhodium, and iridium. The exchange, which is also questionably referred to as transcyclometalation, offers attractive synthetic possibilities and assists in disclosing key mechanistic pathways associated with the C-H bond activation by transition metal complexes and C-M bond cleavage. Both synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the exchange are reviewed and discussed.

    Citation

    Alexander D Ryabov. The Exchange of Cyclometalated Ligands. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland). 2021 Jan 03;26(1)


    PMID: 33401624

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