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Aromatase excess syndrome (AEXS) is a very rare disorder characterized by prepubertal gynecomastia, bone age acceleration and early growth arrest. Heterozygote submicroscopic rearrangements within the promotor of CYP19A1 result in overexpression of aromatase and enhanced aromatization of androgens. The objective was to study long-term treatment effects of an aromatase inhibitor. Data from 7 boys with AEXS were retrospectively collected. Genetic analysis revealed upstream of CYP19A1 a 165,901 bp deletion in 4 German cousins, a 198,662 bp deletion in 2 Japanese brothers and a 387,622 bp tandem duplication in a Japanese boy. All boys developed prepubertal gynecomastia, at 9.0 yr of age (median; range: 7.0 - 11.0). Height was +1.20 SDS (-0.24 - +1.98); predicted adult height was -1.29 (-3.29 - +1.09 SDS). Four boys were treated with 1.0 mg anastrozole daily, while three reached adult height untreated. Treatment with anastrozole was stopped after 5.6 yr (4.0 - 6.8). Three treated boys exceeded their prognosis by 2.4, 6.9 and 8.1 cm; while one untreated fell below by 8.6 cm. One treated with a low dose and two untreated reached their prognosis. Adult heights were -0.91 SDS with anastrozole (-2.86 - -0.29) and -0.15 SDS without (-2.31 - -0.03). Distance to target height was -0.22 SDS with anastrozole (-1.72 - +0.52) and +0.54 SDS without (+0.23 - +1.30). Spontaneous growth in AEXS varied, even in the same family. Our data suggest that early started, long-term inhibition by anastrozole promotes adult height in boys with AEXS. © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

Citation

Gerhard Binder, Akie Nakamura, Roland Schweizer, Tsutomu Ogata, Maki Fukami, Keisuke Nagasaki. Long-term effect of aromatase inhibition in aromatase excess syndrome. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. 2021 Jan 29


PMID: 33513243

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