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    Severe laryngeal edema can cause upper airway obstruction, which is fatal. Pseudoterranova, an uncommon nematode of the family Anisakidae, predominantly invades the stomach after ingestion of the nematodes in raw or undercooked marine fish. There have been a few reports of development of severe laryngeal edema caused by the nematode invading the base of the tongue. A 69-year-old Japanese woman complained of stuffy and scratchy throat for 8 hours and reported eating sashimi, fresh slices of raw jacopever, 4 days before the first visit. Endoscopy revealed a white-yellowish wriggling worm at the left side of the base of the tongue and severe edema of the larynx. The worm was extracted using endoscopic forceps. The patient was hospitalized and treated with intravenous injection of an antibiotic and steroid. The symptoms and laryngeal edema disappeared the next day. The worm was identified as a 4th-stage larva of Pseudoterranova spp based on morphologic features. The serum Anisakis-specific IgE antibody level was high, at 38.6 UA/mL. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of severe laryngeal edema due to invasion by anisakid nematodes in the pharyngolaryngeal area in cases involving previous ingestion of raw or uncooked marine fish. Copyright © 2021 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

    Citation

    Shiori Suzuki, Nobuyuki Bandoh, Takashi Goto, Akihiro Uemura, Mizuki Sasaki, Yasuaki Harabuchi. Severe laryngeal edema caused by Pseudoterranova species: A case report. Medicine. 2021 Jan 29;100(4):e24456

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    PMID: 33530255

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