Correlation Engine 2.0
Clear Search sequence regions


  • acid (6)
  • across (14)
  • adult (20)
  • alleles (2)
  • amphetamine (2)
  • and disease (1)
  • androgens (1)
  • appear (15)
  • axonogenesis (1)
  • BDNF (4)
  • behaviours phenotypes (1)
  • bipolar disorder (1)
  • birth (4)
  • brain (118)
  • CACNA1C (1)
  • cadherin 13 (1)
  • caesarean section (1)
  • cannabis (3)
  • case (2)
  • cellular (7)
  • childhood (3)
  • children (5)
  • chromatin (6)
  • cognition (5)
  • cognitive function (1)
  • cognitive symptoms (2)
  • cohorts (3)
  • COMT (2)
  • corticosteroid (4)
  • cortisol (1)
  • cytokines (4)
  • cytomegalovirus (1)
  • D2 receptor (2)
  • denmark (1)
  • dependent (2)
  • design studies (1)
  • diagnosis (1)
  • diphtheria (1)
  • DNMT1 (1)
  • dopamine (50)
  • embryo (3)
  • essential (3)
  • exert (1)
  • factor (29)
  • function (13)
  • gaba (18)
  • gene (32)
  • glia (1)
  • glucocorticoid (9)
  • glucocorticoid receptor (7)
  • groom (1)
  • guinea pigs (3)
  • help (2)
  • hippocampus (5)
  • Hsd11b2 (4)
  • human (5)
  • hypoxia (27)
  • IL 1β (3)
  • IL 6 (2)
  • impairs (7)
  • infants (2)
  • influenza (2)
  • interest (3)
  • interferon γ (1)
  • iron (8)
  • ischaemia (2)
  • isoforms (3)
  • labour (3)
  • life experiences (1)
  • life stress (2)
  • lmx1a (2)
  • low (5)
  • Mecp2 (4)
  • mesencephalon (2)
  • methyl (3)
  • mice (2)
  • micrornas (9)
  • midbrain (1)
  • mother (4)
  • mrna (2)
  • netherlands (1)
  • neural tube (1)
  • neurogenesis (1)
  • neurons (23)
  • newborns (4)
  • nitrogen (1)
  • nmda (4)
  • NR1 (1)
  • nuclear receptors (2)
  • number exposures (1)
  • Nurr1 (1)
  • nutrient (9)
  • oxygen (2)
  • parents (1)
  • patients (10)
  • period (2)
  • persist (1)
  • phases (1)
  • phenotypes (10)
  • placenta (10)
  • polio (1)
  • positron (1)
  • Ppar (1)
  • pre eclampsia (2)
  • pregnancy (25)
  • problems social (1)
  • process (19)
  • proopiomelanocortin (1)
  • psychosis (2)
  • Ptx3 (2)
  • PUFAs (8)
  • rat (10)
  • reason (1)
  • receptor (5)
  • receptors retinoid x (1)
  • receptors retinoid x (1)
  • reflect (1)
  • regulates gene (2)
  • relatives (1)
  • research (2)
  • respect life (1)
  • risk factors (17)
  • rna (4)
  • rodents (3)
  • schizophrenia (94)
  • shape cells (1)
  • sheep (3)
  • shock (1)
  • smoking (4)
  • social behaviours (2)
  • steroid receptors (1)
  • steroids (3)
  • still (3)
  • stress level (1)
  • studies time (1)
  • suggests (7)
  • supply (1)
  • suppress (1)
  • synapse (3)
  • target genes (1)
  • trauma (1)
  • Trithorax (1)
  • understand (2)
  • uterus (1)
  • variants o (1)
  • vital (1)
  • vitamin (10)
  • vitamin d (8)
  • women pregnant (1)
  • young adults (1)
  • Sizes of these terms reflect their relevance to your search.

    The recognition that schizophrenia is a disorder of neurodevelopment is widely accepted. The original hypothesis was coined more than 30 years ago and the wealth of supportive epidemiologically data continues to grow. A number of proposals have been put forward to suggest how adverse early exposures in utero alter the way the adult brain functions, eventually producing the symptoms of schizophrenia. This of course is extremely difficult to study in developing human brains, so the bulk of what we know comes from animal models of such exposures. In this review, I will summarise the more salient features of how the major epidemiologically validated exposures change the way the brain is formed leading to abnormal function in ways that are informative for schizophrenia symptomology. Surprisingly few studies have examined brain ontogeny from embryo to adult in such models. However, where there is longitudinal data, various convergent mechanisms are beginning to emerge involving stress and immune pathways. There is also a surprisingly consistent alteration in how very early dopamine neurons develop in these models. Understanding how disparate epidemiologically-validated exposures may produce similar developmental brain abnormalities may unlock convergent early disease-related pathways/processes.

    Citation

    Darryl W Eyles. How do established developmental risk-factors for schizophrenia change the way the brain develops? Translational psychiatry. 2021 Mar 08;11(1):158


    PMID: 33686066

    View Full Text