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    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R)-induced inflammatory process can mediate cochlea damage-related hearing loss; whether cochlear spiral ganglion progenitor cell-derived exosomes (CSGPC-exos) play a protective role by carrying functional microRNAs into recipient cells is unknown. Different doses of CSGPC-exos (0.1 μg/μl, 0.2 μg/μl, 0.5 μg/μl, 1.0 μg/μl) were administrated into the cochleae of the I/R group induced with 30-min occlusion of the bilateral vertebral arteries and sham surgery group. The speech-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) test was utilized to estimate the auditory threshold shift. The relative expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected with RT-PCR and Western blot, while parvalbumin and caspase-3 expression were detected by immunofluorescence staining in the cochleae. The relative expression of microRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-26a-5p, and miR-181a-5p) was detected in the cochleae. I/R significantly up-regulated ABR threshold shift and promoted hair cell apoptosis indicated by parvalbumin and caspase-3 staining, while CSGPC-exos (0.5 μg/μl, 1.0 μg/μl) could diminish such damages with downregulated proinflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and Cox-2) and upregulated anti-inflammatory miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-26a-5p, and miR-181a-5p) expression in the cochleae. CSGPC-exos could protect cochleae damage from I/R, probably via inhibiting the inflammatory process. © 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

    Citation

    Tao Yang, Cuiyun Cai, Anquan Peng, Jia Liu, Qin Wang. Exosomes derived from cochlear spiral ganglion progenitor cells prevent cochlea damage from ischemia-reperfusion injury via inhibiting the inflammatory process. Cell and tissue research. 2021 Nov;386(2):239-247

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    PMID: 34155579

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