Correlation Engine 2.0
Clear Search sequence regions


Sizes of these terms reflect their relevance to your search.

Tourniquets are routinely used in high tibial osteotomy (HTO). However, research on the necessity of tourniquets during HTO is lacking. This study was designed to investigate the necessity of tourniquets in HTO. This was a prospective study that included patients who underwent HTO at the same hospital. The patients were randomised into Group A (non-tourniquet, n = 45) and Group B (tourniquet, n = 45). Same surgical techniques and haemostatic methods were used in the two groups. All patients were followed up for more than three months. There was no difference in operation time, and no intra-operative vascular or nerve damage occurred in either group. The hospital stay was shorter in group A than in group B (p < 0.05). There was no difference in post-operative blood loss, haemoglobin or haematocrit (p > 0.05). The post-operative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores and calf swelling were lower in group A (p < 0.05), and the early knee range of motion was higher in group A (p < 0.05). The use of morphine and the incidence of thigh complications were also lower in group A (p < 0.05). There was no difference in the VAS and knee function between the two groups at three months post-operatively (p > 0.05). Tourniquet use during HTO does not reduce post-operative blood loss, operation time or intra-operative complications, but not using a tourniquet shortens the hospital stay and reduces the post-operative usage of morphine and tourniquet-related complications, which promotes early recovery of knee function. © 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to The Author(s) under exclusive licence to SICOT aisbl.

Citation

Songlin Li, Xiangshuai Zhang, Mingxing Liu, Qunshan Lu, Yang Yu, Zhuang Miao, Desu Luo, Kaifei Han, Lei Li, Wenwei Qian, Peilai Liu. Not using a tourniquet is superior to tourniquet use for high tibial osteotomy: a prospective, randomised controlled trial. International orthopaedics. 2022 Apr;46(4):823-829

Expand section icon Mesh Tags

Expand section icon Substances


PMID: 34677629

View Full Text