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Multi-gas detection represents a suitable solution in many applications, such as environmental and atmospheric monitoring, chemical reaction and industrial process control, safety and security, oil&gas and biomedicine. Among optical techniques, Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS) has been demonstrated to be a leading-edge technology for addressing multi-gas detection, thanks to the modularity, ruggedness, portability and real time operation of the QEPAS sensors. The detection module consists in a spectrophone, mounted in a vacuum-tight cell and detecting sound waves generated via photoacoustic excitation within the gas sample. As a result, the sound detection is wavelength-independent and the volume of the absorption cell is basically determined by the spectrophone dimensions, typically in the order of few cubic centimeters. In this review paper, the implementation of the QEPAS technique for multi-gas detection will be discussed for three main areas of applications: i) multi-gas trace sensing by exploiting non-interfering absorption features; ii) multi-gas detection dealing with overlapping absorption bands; iii) multi-gas detection in fluctuating backgrounds. The fundamental role of the analysis and statistical tools will be also discussed in detail in relation with the specific applications. This overview on QEPAS technique, highlighting merits and drawbacks, aims at providing ready-to-use guidelines for multi-gas detection in a wide range of applications and operating conditions. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Citation

Angelo Sampaolo, Pietro Patimisco, Marilena Giglio, Andrea Zifarelli, Hongpeng Wu, Lei Dong, Vincenzo Spagnolo. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for multi-gas detection: A review. Analytica chimica acta. 2022 Apr 15;1202:338894

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PMID: 35341511

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