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    Recurrent primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is routinely treated by video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) talc pleurodesis (with or without localized resection of macroscopic bullous disease). There is a paucity of published data regarding durability of the procedure and the rate of recurrent pneumothorax after such surgery, and this has significant implications from a prognostic and employment limitation perspective. Patients who underwent a VATS talc pleurodesis (with or without localized resection of macroscopic bullous disease) for the treatment of their second or subsequent PSP or a PSP were followed for recurrent ipsilateral pneumothorax and new contralateral PSP. Follow up was by way of telephone interview and medical record verification out to 48 months. New contralateral pneumothorax occurred in 7 patients (11.1%) in the talc pleurodesis plus wedge resection group and 2 (1.8%) in the talc pleurodesis only group. There was one case of recurrent ipsilateral pneumothorax in a patient who had no inflammatory response to talc insufflation. Video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) talc pleurodesis (and lung resection for macroscopic bullous disease) is a durable treatment for recurrent PSP. Patients with macroscopic disease have a significant risk of subsequent contralateral PSP. © 2023 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

    Citation

    Nicholas Kennedy, Nicholas Petrakis, Justin Chan, Craig Jurisevic. Spontaneous pneumothorax rates following video-assisted thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis with or without resection of macroscopic bullous disease. ANZ journal of surgery. 2023 Oct;93(10):2402-2405

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    PMID: 37332259

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